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Imperial Palaces of the Ming and Qing Dynasties in Beijing and Shenyang

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    Imperial Palaces of the Ming and Qing Dynasties in Beijing and Shenyang by Heran Liu

     

    The Forbidden City in Beijing is the imperial palace of Ming and Qing dynasties with amazing landscaped garden and nearly 10,000 rooms contain furniture and works of art. The imperial palace of the Qing dynasty in Shenyang consists of 114 buildings which are constructed between 1625-26 and 1783. The Imperial Palace of the Ming and Qing dynasties in Beijing and Shenyang were the centre of state power in late feudal China from 15th to 20th century. The Ming emperor Zhu Di asked to build the Imperial Palace of the Ming and Qing dynasties in known as the Forbidden City in 1406 to 1420 in Beijing. It is commonly known as the Forbidden City because the general public had no access to it in Ming and Qing dynasties. It was not meant to be a home for an emperor but for the Son of Heaven. With huge re walls enclosed the inner sanctum, an area forbidden to normal mortals (worldheritagesite.org). The people’s government of Beijing Municipality demarcated an area of 1,377 hectares as the buffer zone of the Imperial Palace in 2005. The Imperial Palace in Shenyang was built between 1625 and 1637 by Nurgaci for Nuzhen forebears of Qing dynasty. It was used as the secondary capital and temporary residence for the royal family until 1911. The Imperial Palaces of Beijing and Shenyang were listed in the World Heritage List in 1987 and 2004 respectively (UNESCO).  

     

    Managerial challenges

    The Imperial Palaces of the Ming and Qing dynasties have been well protected in the past century. Also, based on the implementation of the Las of the People’s Republic of China on the Protection of Cultural Relics, the Imperial Palace of Ming and Qing dynasties were well protected, too. But, as UNESCO suggests that all the regulations concerning the protection and management of the imperial Palaces should be strictly implemented especially the number of tourists in the Forbidden City should be effectively controlled to reduce the negative impact of the property. In 2012, it was 182,000 visits in one day in the ‘Golden Week’ (News163).

     

     

     

    Reference

    Centre, U. (2000). Imperial Palaces of the Ming and Qing Dynasties in Beijing and Shenyang - UNESCO World Heritage Centre. [online] Whc.unesco.org. Available at: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/439 [Accessed 15 Nov. 2014].

     

    News.163.com, (2014). 182,000 visits in one day of the Forbidden City, a new record.  [online] Available at: http://news.163.com/12/1003/00/8CRQG...T2TJL000AN0001 [Accessed 15 Nov. 2014].

     

    News, A. (2014). Video: Beijing's Forbidden City Revealed. [online] ABC News. Available at: http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/video?id=6248796 [Accessed 17 Nov. 2014].

     

    Worldheritagesite.org, (2014). Imperial Palaces of the Ming and Qing Dynasties in Beijing and Shenyang - World Heritage Site - Pictures, info and travel reports. [online] Available at: http://www.worldheritagesite.org/sit...emingqing.html [Accessed 15 Nov. 2014].

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    Comments (3)

    Viewing 3 of 3 comments: view all
    Hey Heran,

    Very interesting post about the Imperial Palaces of the Ming and Qing Dynasty in Beijing and Shenyang. The written text is really informative I know the above picture is one of the Forbidden City in Beijing, but that's maybe because I visited the place myself. For other people they might get confused if it's either the one in Beijing or Shenyang. For the rest you did a good job, keep up the good work! :)

    Best regards,
    Sander
    Posted 15:51, 18 Nov 2014
    Thank you Sander for the comment. Great that we all visited the place. I would wanted that the text addressing the managerial issues would have more information, at the moment it is overcrowding that is the major challenge, what does it leads to, what are the risks and who is the responsible in order to minimize them? Who owns the place? The whole nation? There must be an authority that stands behind it. I liked your text more in case you were able to give us more details around this issue. Best, Albina
    Posted 22:28, 21 Nov 2014
    Hi, Sander, thank you for your advice, maybe i should add some explaination about this picture. That could be better I think.
    Posted 19:56, 5 Dec 2014
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